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Read online Comment faire mentir les cartes, ou, Du mauvais usage de la géographie.pdf PDF, EPUB, MOBI, TXT, DOC Comment faire mentir les cartes, ou, Du mauvais usage de la géographie No description available by Mark Monmonier

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Comment faire mentir les cartes, ou, Du mauvais usage de la géographie
Title:Comment faire mentir les cartes, ou, Du mauvais usage de la géographie
Format Type:eBook PDF / e-Pub
Rating:
Author:
Published:
ISBN:2082115577
ISBN 13:
Number of Pages:232
Category:Non fiction, Geography, Maps, Cartography, Science, Reference
Review #Top 1
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How to Lie with Maps, Drawing the Lines: Tales of Maps and Cartocontroversy, Cartographies of Danger: Mapping Hazards in America, From Squaw Tit to Whorehouse Meadow: How Maps Name, Claim, and Inflame, Spying with Maps: Surveillance Technologies and the Future of Privacy, Lake Effect: Tales of Large Lakes, Arctic Winds, and Recurrent Snows, No Dig, No Fly, No Go: How Maps Restrict and Control, Coast Lines: How Mapmakers Frame the World and Chart Environmental Change, Air Apparent: How Meteorologists Learned to Map, Predict, and Dramatize Weather, Mapping It Out: Expository Cartography for the Humanities and Social Sciences
No place is perfectly safe but some places are more dangerous than others Whether we live on a floodplain or in Tornado Alley near a nuclear facility or in a neighborhood poorly lit at night we all co exist uneasily with natural and man made hazards As Mark Monmonier shows in this entertaining and immensely informative book maps can tell us a lot about where we can anticipate certain hazards but they can also be dangerously misleading br br California for example takes earthquakes seriously with a comprehensive program of seismic mapping whereas Washington has been comparatively lax about earthquakes in Puget Sound But as the Northridge earthquake in January demonstrated all too clearly to Californians even reliable seismic hazard maps can deceive anyone who misinterprets known fault lines as the only places vulnerable to earthquakes br br Important as it is to predict and prepare for catastrophic natural hazards more subtle and persistent phenomena such as pollution and crime also pose serious dangers that we have to cope with on a daily basis Hazard zone maps highlight these more insidious hazards and raise awareness about them among planners local officials and the public br br With the help of many maps illustrating examples from all corners of the United States Monmonier demonstrates how hazard mapping reflects not just scientific understanding of hazards but also perceptions of risk and how risk can be reduced Whether you live on a faultline or a coastline near a toxic waste dump or an EMF generating power line you ignore this book s plain language advice on geographic hazards and how to avoid them at your own peril br br No one should buy a home rent an apartment or even drink the local water without having read this fascinating cartographic alert on the dangers that lurk in our everyday lives Who has not asked where it is safe to live i Cartographies of Danger i provides the answer H J de Blij i NBC News i br br Even if you re not interested in maps you re almost certainly interested in hazards And this book is one of the best places I ve seen to learn about them in a highly entertaining and informative fashion John Casti i New Scientist i br br, Weather maps have made our atmosphere visible understandable and at least moderately predictable In i Air Apparent i Mark Monmonier traces debates among scientists eager to unravel the enigma of storms and global change explains strategies for mapping the upper atmosphere and forecasting disaster and discusses efforts to detect and control air pollution Fascinating in its scope and detail i Air Apparent i makes us take a second look at the weather map an image that has been and continues to be central to our daily lives br br Clever title rewarding book Monmonier offers here a basic course in meteorology which he presents gracefully by means of a history of weather maps i Scientific American i br br Mark Monmonier is onto a winner with i Air Apparent i It is good accessible science and excellent history Read it Fred Pearce i New Scientist i br br i Air Apparent i is a superb first reading for any backyard novice of weather but even the veteran forecaster or researcher will find it engaging and in some cases enlightening Joe Venuti i Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society i br br Monmonier is solid enough in his discussion of geographic and meteorological information to satisfy the experienced weather watcher But even if this information were not presented in such a lively and engaging manner it would still hook most any reader who checks the weather map every morning or who sits happily entranced through a full cycle of forecasts on the Weather Channel Michael Kennedy i Boston Globe i, Writers know only too well how long it can take and how awkward it can be to describe spatial relationships with words alone And while a map might not always be worth a thousand words a good one can help writers communicate an argument or explanation clearly succinctly and effectively br br In his acclaimed i How to Lie with Maps i Mark Monmonier showed how maps can distort facts In i Mapping it Out Expository Cartography for the Humanities and Social Sciences i he shows authors and scholars how they can use expository cartography the visual two dimensional organization of information to heighten the impact of their books and articles br br This concise practical book is an introduction to the fundamental principles of graphic logic and design from the basics of scale to the complex mapping of movement or change Monmonier helps writers and researchers decide when maps are most useful and what formats work best in a wide range of subject areas from literary criticism to sociology He demonstrates for example various techniques for representing changes and patterns different typefaces and how they can either clarify or confuse information and the effectiveness of less traditional map forms such as visibility base maps frame rectangle symbols and complementary scatterplot designs for conveying complex spatial relationships br br There is also a wealth of practical information on map compilation cartobibliographies copyright and permissions facsimile reproduction and the evaluation of source materials Appendixes discuss the benefits and limitations of electronic graphics and pen and ink drafting and how to work with a cartographic illustrator br br Clearly written and filled with real world examples i Mapping it Out i demystifies mapmaking for anyone writing in the humanities and social sciences br br A useful guide to a subject most people probably take too much for granted It shows how map makers translate abstract data into eye catching cartograms as they are called It combats cartographic illiteracy It fights cartophobia It may even teach you to find your way Christopher Lehmann Haupt i The New York Times i, p Some maps help us find our way others restrict where we go and what we do These maps control behavior regulating activities from flying to fishing prohibiting students from one part of town from being schooled on the other and banishing certain individuals and industries to the periphery This restrictive cartography has boomed in recent decades as governments seek regulate activities as diverse as hiking building a residence opening a store locating a chemical plant or painting your house anything but regulation colors It is this aspect of mapping its power to prohibit that celebrated geographer Mark Monmonier tackles in i No Dig No Fly No Go i br br Rooted in ancient Egypt s need to reestablish property boundaries following the annual retreat of the Nile s floodwaters restrictive mapping has been indispensable in settling the American West claiming slices of Antarctica protecting fragile ocean fisheries and keeping sex offenders away from playgrounds But it has also been used for opprobrium during one of the darkest moments in American history cartographic exclusion orders helped send thousands of Japanese Americans to remote detention camps Tracing the power of prohibitive mapping at multiple levels from regional to international and multiple dimensions from property to cyberspace Monmonier demonstrates how much boundaries influence our experience from homeownership and voting to taxation and airline travel A worthy successor to his critically acclaimed i How to Lie with Maps i the book is replete with all of the hallmarks of a Monmonier classic including the wry observations and witty humor br br In the end Monmonier looks far beyond the lines on the page to observe that mapped boundaries however persuasive their appearance are not always as permanent and impermeable as their cartographic lines might suggest Written for anyone who votes owns a home or aspires to be an informed citizen i No Dig No Fly No Go i will change the way we look at maps forever br p